I took a nice photo of the Caprice from a different angle for a change. Actually, it is two photos stitched together so the angle is a bit weird, but here is an overall view of the state of the restoration as seen from the outside as of this afternoon:

lil-muleII.jpg

And a photo of Nightwatch to see where all this is going:

Jouet-caprice-nightwatch.jpg

The first thing that I attacked this morning was to mark where I needed to grind down in order to make the correct height of the roof. For this I used a laser, the only way I could get pinpoint accuracy on a curved surface. I had the starting and ending points so the laser did the rest: laser.jpg

I noticed something odd however, the dip in the middle. I need to double check, but it may be that the Lil' Mule II's roof is one centimeter lower than that of the Ressie Jouet.

I then got out the hammer and chisel to start removing all the crap that was put there when the new roof was added. As you can see, it is once again the famous cardboard-like board used for core:

crap.jpg

I don't have a photo of what came next. Imaging about two hours of grinding and sanding fiberglass to get a perfect surface. Well that is what I did. Once that was done, I moved on to removing the bulkheads.

A little photo to show the angle of where one of them meets the roof:

corner.jpg

I took measurements from all over, and it appears that the roof is made out of 5mm solid fiberglass:

5-mm.jpg

The bulkheads on the Jouët Caprice are held in place by a series of large screws along the outside. Once removed, the bulkheads just pop right out.

This has caused me to reflect on the logic of my plans to make a fully integrated buklhead and roof. The ability to remove them for repair, cleaning etc. is worth considering.

Once removed, you get this:

captains-bed-small.jpg

Here is a quick shot from above, showing the area without the wood trim. You can somewhat see what it looks like after the crap has been removed and it has been sanded clean:

from-above.jpg

Finally, here is a photo of of the sides of the roof when ground down to the perfect height: side-view.jpg

You can see the dip bit in the middle, which I need to reflect on.

Also, I have started to taper the outside in preparation for the overlapping fiberglass of the new roof...